Volume 1, Issue 2, September 2015, Page: 13-18
Establishing Diagnostic Reference Level for Computed Tomography Examination in Madagascar
Ralaivelo Mbolatiana Anjarasoa Luc, Department of Dosimetry and Radiation Protection, National Institute of Sciences and Nuclear Techniques (INSTN-Madagascar)
Ramanandraibe Marie Jeanne, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Fianarantsoa, Madagascar
Raoelina Andraimbololona, Department of Theoretical Physics, INSTN-Madagascar
Randrianarivony Edmond, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Antananarivo, Madagascar
Zafimanjato J. L. Radaorolala, Department of Dosimetry and Radiation Protection, National Institute of Sciences and Nuclear Techniques (INSTN-Madagascar)
Randriantsizafy Ralainirina Dina, Department of Dosimetry and Radiation Protection, National Institute of Sciences and Nuclear Techniques (INSTN-Madagascar)
Randriamora Tiana Harimalala, Department of Dosimetry and Radiation Protection, National Institute of Sciences and Nuclear Techniques (INSTN-Madagascar)
Received: Aug. 7, 2015;       Accepted: Dec. 14, 2015;       Published: Dec. 14, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.rst.20150102.11      View  4346      Downloads  172
Abstract
The doses received by the patient during Computed Tomography (CT) examination are relatively significant compared with the doses received by patients undergoing classic X-ray examinations. Owing to this, each country should adopt a consistent policy to optimize the doses delivered to the patient during CT examination. One of the available options for the dose optimization is the implementation of the Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) to evaluate thedose delivered to the patient and to guide the operators for the choice of parameters during CT examinations. Actually, Madagascar hasn’t got yet his own DRLs, so that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or other international existing DRLs are used to fill this gap. The present study was performed to analyze the feasibility of setting (DRLs) atnational level. The study is a part of an IAEA Project entitled “Strengthening Technical Capabilities for Patient and Occupational Radiation Protection in Member States”, RAF9053. For this purpose, three public and private hospitals using computed tomography were selected. The patient dose assessment was performed by determining the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI), Multiple Scan Average Dose (MSAD), Dose Length Product (DLP) and Effective dose (E) for an adult chest and skull CT examination. Pencil ionization chamber was used, having an active length of 100 mm, connected with an electrometer (RAD-CHECK). The system was calibrated through the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory of Madagascar (SSDL-Madagascar) before the measurements campaign. To simulate the patient presence, two types of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantoms were used. The first, having 32 cm diameter was used to replace an adult body patient, and the second phantom, having 16 cm diameter simulate the head of an adult patient. The results were compared with the International Diagnostic Reference Level which is chosen for this study. It has beenestablished that the obtained values are similar to the existing DRLs. Measurements performed during this study can be useful for the patient dose optimization and considered as the first and main step for the National Diagnostic Reference Level setting for Computed Tomography in Madagascar.
Keywords
Computed Tomography, CTDI, DLP, DRLs, Patient Dose
To cite this article
Ralaivelo Mbolatiana Anjarasoa Luc, Ramanandraibe Marie Jeanne, Raoelina Andraimbololona, Randrianarivony Edmond, Zafimanjato J. L. Radaorolala, Randriantsizafy Ralainirina Dina, Randriamora Tiana Harimalala, Establishing Diagnostic Reference Level for Computed Tomography Examination in Madagascar, Radiation Science and Technology. Vol. 1, No. 2, 2015, pp. 13-18. doi: 10.11648/j.rst.20150102.11
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